It is sometimes painfully apparent that the hardest thing people have a difficult time with is eating healthy. A person can want to get in the best shape of their life and they will work hard in the gym, but often will not cut out the habits that are sabotaging the pursuit of their goals.

Negative self talk, choosing the couch over activity, alcohol, soda, cigarettes, cookies, diet drinks, candy, ice cream, and all the other unhealthy habits people have hold on like a Velcro to a sweater in the dryer.

Chances are, you read some of the things listed and thought, “Well, I don’t smoke, or drink beer” or “I don’t ever eat candy.”

Ok, what habits are standing in your way to better health?

What cycles of negative self talk and emotions are you making agreement with that reinforce your poor habits?

Most people realize that bad food is not doing anything good for their bodies, but do you realize what it may be doing to your brain?

Nobody wants to deal with dementia in their old age and if you have firsthand experience with a family member or friend with Alzheimer’s disease, you would likely do anything to avoid that fate. The good news is, there is evidence showing that you have a lot of ways to control the risk of dementia. Some researchers have concluded that Alzheimer’s is not a disease of old age, but rather a lifelong process that begins in youth (Marano, 2016). In one study, Richard Isaacson found that as a little as six months of a healthy diet with lots of fresh vegetables and light on carbohydrates can reduce memory decline, speed up mental processing, and enhance inhibitory control and attention (Marano, 2016).

Dr. Lisa Mosconi, the founder and director of the Nutrition and Brain Fitness Lab at New York University Medical Center, found that people who consumed foods high in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, and sodium had lower brain volumes than people who ate healthier (Marano, 2016). Marano points out that Mosconi only found strong effects when the nutrients were consumed in food and not from supplements.

Foods that are bad for you can increase inflammation in the body and the brain. Food allergies, unique to each person, can increase inflammation in the brain which will lead to decreased blood flow. Dr. Daniel Amen, the leading expert in SPECT brain imaging displays SPECT images of healthy brains and unhealthy brains on his website. The amount of activity in specific areas of the brain decreases greatly with even moderate alcohol consumption and a high sugar diet.

Nicotine makes the negative effects even stronger. Your generous pour of one glass of wine per night is likely not as good for you as you think. You can get much more antioxidants from fresh fruit and vegetables and not do any damage to your brain or body.

Sugar is the first thing you need to kick in your diet. Sugar is often hidden with other names such as sorbitol, fructose, cane juice crystals, maltose, fruit juice concentrate, high-fructose corn syrup, and barley malt (Amen & Amen, 2016).

Dr. Amen and his wife, Tana Amen, BSN, RN, point out that farmers feed animals corn, soy, and potatoes to make them fat very quickly (2016). If that is not enough of a reason to steer clear, know that many of the pesticides used in treating these common foods are associated with ADHD, cancer, depression, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, hypothyroidism, and liver disease (Amen & Amen, 2016).

The good news is, your brain can heal itself if you stop putting bad things in and replace them with good nutrients, fruits and vegetables. You will also want to take in high quality proteins like eggs, fish, lamb, chicken, beef and bison. It will also benefit you to take in nuts and seeds, lentils, chickpeas, and quality grains like quinoa. Keep your grain intake on the low end, but do not cut it out.

Cook with healthy oils like avocado oil, coconut oil, macadamia nut oil and olive oil. Your brain and your body will get healthier and thank you. Eat healthy whether you want a better brain or a better body. The two work together to support the other. Adding in exercise to your new diet will make maintaining it easier and will enhance the positive effects of good food on your brain. Think strong, be strong, and live a long healthy life. What’s stopping you?!

Coach Blaine Davidson

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References

Amen, D. G., & Amen, T. (2016). The brain warrior’s way: ignite your energy and focus, attack illness and aging, transform pain into purpose. New York: New American Library.
Marano, H. E. (2016, Nov. & Dec.). Human Brain: no known expiration date. Psychology Today, 49(6), 63-88.

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